How to Patch On a Leather Jacket? | How to Sew a Patch on a Leather Jacket?

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How to Patch On a Leather Jacket

Do you think patches look cool? They definitely do! Look, patches are the best way to put on your identity on your denim tees or leather jackets. It looks inspiring and enchanting. There are great tips for how to patch on a leather jacket? Sewing patches on leather is easy peasy! There are two different ways to do it: One method is to sew the patch on leather and the other is to attach patches to leather without sewing (using fabric glue/adhesives). Sewing patches onto leather and other clothing are always effective because the patch does not fall off easily. To sew a patch means the patch is permanently fixed on your outfit. On this note let’s get started with our sewing method.

 

How To Patch On a Leather Jacket | Tips To Sew a Patch On a Leather Using Sewing Machine:

Before you get started let us tell you some important tips to get the task done easily!

A sewing machine is the fastest way to patch on a leather jacket. You can also hand-sew patches on leather however it will be more time taking and difficult. The process will be the same for both ways but keep in mind to use a thimble if you’re using your hand to sew patches onto the leather.

wide stitch

The thread you need to sew patches on a leather jacket has to be made of 100% polyester or nylon. No cotton should be added to the thread. Cotton thread is not good for leather because cotton reacts with tannin present inside the leather and eventually results in rotting. So ensure that your thread is cotton-free.

Tools for Sewing a Patch on a Leather Jacket?

You must have these few things before you are ready. Here goes the list:

  • A leather sewing machine
  • 18-gauge needle
  • Polyester or nylon thread (avoid cotton)
  • A spray adhesive or glue stick
  • Scissors

Steps for How to Sew a Patch on a Leather Jacket?

How to patch on a leather jacket? These are the simplest steps to do it:

  1. Use a Sewing Machine That can Sew Leather
  2. Use a wide stitch along with an 18-gauge needle
  3. Spray the adhesive or use a glue stick on the patch back
  4. Choose a spot for your patches
  5. Start sewing patches from the corner
  6. Overlapping the first and the last stitches
  7. Remove the jacket and cut out the thread

Leather Jacket

Use a Sewing Machine That can Sew Leather: 

A standard sewing machine is not a good fit for the job. First, you need to buy a sewing machine particularly made to do leather works. A heavy-duty sewing machine can also work.

Use a wide stitch along with an 18-gauge needle:

Setting up the sewing machine is the second step. Use a leather needle for this job because leather is hard and a standard needle will not be the best option for it. Otherwise, make sure your needle is strong enough and thick to patch on a leather jacket. Now adjust the settings to change the length of the stitch to the widest option available which might be usually 0.32 cm (1/8 inch) in width. For that, sew up your machine with a wide stitch and an 18-gauge needle.

Spray the adhesive or use a glue stick on the patch back:

Use a spray adhesive on the back of the patch. It is a crucial step! Spraying adhesive on the patch’s back will keep the patch in place and it will not misplace when you’re sewing the patch onto the leather jacket. The easiest way to do this is to shake the spray adhesive and (just mist it) on the backside; hold the patch for a couple of seconds. An alternate way is to use a fabric glue stick if you don’t have a spray adhesive. We will highly condemn the use of pins because it will tear the fabric and leave prominent holes in the leather jacket.

Choose a spot for your patches: 

spot for your patches

Put the patches on the spots you want to attach the patches. Use adhesive spray to stick the patches with the leather jacket. After you spray, hold the patch gently until they get secure in its place.

Start sewing patches from the corner:

Here comes the tricky part. Begin sewing like a pro! The tip to sew patches on a leather jacket is to start sewing from the corner of the patch. While your sewing does not move around the patch, try to keep it as close to the embroidered borders of the patch. Keep your hand firm and move slowly from one corner to the next. It will be nice!

One more tip for tricky corners is whenever you change your angle or move to another corner make sure your needle is pushed downward. Afterward, you lift the needle and rotate the side of the jacket. Now continue sewing the patch onto your leather jacket. For a leather vest, keep going with the lining to give it a smoother finish.

Overlapping the first and the last stitches:

Sew the patch until you reach the starting point again. Now you have to overlap the first and the last stitches by one-to-one and a half inches straight at the point from where you started and finished your sewing process. It will make the stitches more strong and firm within the leather and reduce the load of backstitching. So remember the one-to-one-and-a-half-inches (2.6 – 3.9cm) trick.

jacket

Remove the jacket and cut out the thread: 

Release the jacket from the sewing machine and trim your leather jacket by cutting the threads as close to the lining and the path as possible. And your cool leather patch jacket is ready to style!

Conclusion:

Sewing patches onto leather jackets is the safest way to secure the patches for long-lasting use! Patches look cool on leather and clothing and machine-sewn patches give a nicer and clean look to the patch. Always try to plan the stitches beforehand. The removal of the patches from leather jackets can be difficult but, if you find your patch is not placed properly or the patch is not going great with it just undo all the stitches carefully.

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